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What’s Left Behind: Identity Continuity Moderates the Effect of Nostalgia on Well-Being and Life Choices

August 1, 2011 Leave a comment

What’s Left Behind: Identity Continuity Moderates the Effect of Nostalgia on Well-Being and Life Choices

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume 101, Issue 1, July 2011, Pages 94-108

Aarti Iyer and Jolanda Jetten

Previous research has demonstrated that nostalgia for the past can have positive consequences for individuals’ psychological well-being and their perceived ability to cope with challenges in the present (Wildschut, Sedikides, Arndt, & Routledge, 2006). We propose that this effect is limited to circumstances in which individuals have maintained identity continuity between the past and the present. Support for this moderation hypothesis is obtained in a longitudinal survey (Study 1) and two experiments (Studies 2 and 3) among students entering university. Whereas previously observed positive effects of nostalgia were confirmed when identity continuity had been maintained, feeling nostalgic about the past in the context of lower identity continuity had negative consequences for well-being (Studies 1 and 3), perceived ability to cope with challenges (Studies 1 and 2), and interest in new opportunities (Studies 2 and 3) rather than focusing on familiar experiences (Study 3). Taken together, results indicate that the extent to which individuals view the present as linked to the past has important implications for the outcome of their nostalgia.

Author Keywords: nostalgia; identity continuity; life transitions; social identity; change

Categories: Identification

The Development and Validation of the Multi-Dimensional Identification Scale (MDIS)

July 27, 2011 Leave a comment

The Development and Validation of the Multi-Dimensional Identification Scale (MDIS)

 

Journal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume 41, Issue 7, pages 1632–1658, July 2011

JASON STONER, PAMELA L. PERREWÉ, CHARLES HOFACKER

Based on recent identity research, we developed the Multi-Dimensional Identity Scale (MDIS), and the psychometric properties of the MDIS are examined. We report the results of 3 studies used for item generation and analyses and exploratory factor structure analysis (Study 1), confirmatory factor structure analyses (Studies 1, 2, and 3), and construct validity (Study 3). Collectively, these studies illustrate the psychometric properties of a new measure of identity that is multidimensional and adaptable to various identity bases (i.e., organizational, family, social). Based on exploratory and confirmatory studies, our measure demonstrates the same factor structure for organization-based identity and social-based identity and a similar factor structure for family-based identity. Convergent and discriminant validity are demonstrated.

Categories: Identification

Ritualized Interaction for the Advancement of Children’s National Identification in Hong Kong

July 12, 2011 Leave a comment

Ritualized Interaction for the Advancement of Children’s National Identification in Hong Kong
Journal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume 41, Issue 6, pages 1486–1513, June 2011

CHAU-KIU CHEUNG, JESSICA CHI-MEI LI

Both ongoing practice and the theory of interaction ritual chains imply the significance of the contribution that ritual makes to group solidarity, such as national identification. This contribution is in need of empirical examination as in this study, which surveyed 1,788 schoolchildren in Hong Kong, a special administrative region of China. The results show that, controlling for earlier national identification behavior (within the previous year) and other predictors, ritualized interaction in an activity for national cause (within the previous 6 months) manifested both linear and quadratic positive effects on current national identification sentiment. The effect was stronger for children who previously displayed lower national identification behavior. These results favor the use of ritual to promote national identification.

Categories: Identification

The Relationships of Role Clarity and Organization-Based Self-Esteem to Commitment to Supervisors and Organizations and Turnover Intentions

July 12, 2011 Leave a comment

The Relationships of Role Clarity and Organization-Based Self-Esteem to Commitment to Supervisors and Organizations and Turnover Intentions

Journal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume 41, Issue 6, pages 1455–1485, June 2011

ALEXANDRA PANACCIO, CHRISTIAN VANDENBERGHE

We examined the relationships of role clarity and organization-based self-esteem with 4 dimensions of commitment to supervisors and organizations (affective, normative, perceived high sacrifice, perceived lack of alternatives) and turnover intentions. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the hypothesized 8-factor model of commitment. Structural equation modeling analyses revealed that role clarity was positively related to affective, normative, and perceived high sacrifice supervisory commitment; while it was not related to organizational commitments. Organization-based self-esteem was positively associated with affective commitment to organizations and supervisors; it was also negatively associated with the lack of alternatives component of supervisory and organizational commitment. Finally, the affective and high-sacrifice dimensions of supervisory commitment related to turnover intentions via parallel forms of organizational commitment.

Categories: Identification

Attachment Insecurities and the Processing of Threat-Related Information: Studying the Schemas Involved in Insecure People’s Coping Strategies

Attachment Insecurities and the Processing of Threat-Related Information: Studying the Schemas Involved in Insecure People’s Coping Strategies

Source: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Volume 101, Issue 1, July 2011, Pages 78-93
Tsachi, Ein-Dor , Mario, Mikulincer , Phillip R., Shaver

In 6 studies we examined procedural, scriptlike knowledge associated with 2 different kinds of attachment insecurity: anxiety and avoidance. The studies examined associations between attachment insecurities, the cognitive accessibility of sentinel and rapid fight–flightschemas, and the extent to which these schemas guide the processing of threat-related information and actual behavior during an experimentally induced threatening event. Anxious attachment was associated with (a) greater accessibility of the sentinel schema in narratives of threatening events; (b) faster, deeper, and more schema-biased processing of information about components of the sentinel schema; and (c) quicker detection of a threat. Avoidant attachment was associated with greater accessibility of the rapid fight–flight schema in narratives of threatening events and faster, deeper, and more schema-biased processing of information about components of the schema. We discuss implications of the findings for understanding the cognitive aspects of insecure people’s coping strategies in threatening situations, as well as the potential benefits of these strategies to the people who enact them and to the groups to which they belong.

 

Author Keywords: attachment; social defense theory; anxiety; avoidance; inclusive fitness

Tsachi Ein-Dor is also at the Department of Psychology, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel.We would like to thank Maya Welsh, Moshe Gross, Adi Ben-Ami, and Tal Orgad for their help in running the reported studies.
Categories: Identification

Alumni and their alma mater: A partial test of the reformulated model of organizational identificaiton

June 27, 2011 Leave a comment

 Alumni and their alma mater: A partial test of the reformulated model of organizational identificaiton

Organizational identification is defined as a perceived oneness with an organization and the experience of the organization’s successes and failures as one’s own. While identification is considered important to the organization, it has not been clearly operationalized. The current study tests a proposed model of organizational identification. Self-report data from 297 alumni of an all-male religious college indicate that identification with the almamater was associated with: (1) the hypothesized organizational antecedents of organizational distinctiveness, organizational prestige, and (absence of) intraorganizational competition, but not with interorganizational competition, (2) the hypothesized individual antecedents of satisfaction with the organization, tenure as students, and sentimentality, but not with recency of attendance, number of schools attended, or the existence of a mentor, and (3) the hypothesized outcomes of making financial contributions, willingness to advise one’s offspring and others to attend the college, and participating in various school functions. The findings provide direction for academic administrators seeking to increase alumni support, as well as for corporate managers concerned about the loyalty of workers in an era of mergers and takeovers.

Categories: Identification

The What, How, Why, and Where of Self-Construal

June 24, 2011 Leave a comment

The What, How, Why, and Where of Self-Construal

 

Since the publication of Markus and Kitayama’s pivotal article on culture and the self, the concepts ofindependentrelational, and interdependent self-construal have become important constructs in cultural psychology and research on the self. The authors review the history of these constructs, their measurement and manipulation, and their roles in cognition, emotion, motivation, and social behavior. They make suggestions for future research and point to problems still to be sorted out. Researchers interested in these constructs have many opportunities to make important contributions to the literature in a variety of fields, including health psychology, education, counseling, and international relations.

 

personality and social psychology review

Categories: Identification